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WHAT ARE FILLERS IN AESTHETICS ?

Fillers are a type of minimally invasive aesthetic medicine used to add volume, alter the contours of the face, and fill in wrinkles. Common areas to inject fillers are in the face, neck, and hands, resulting in a fuller, smoother and more youthful appearance. Dermal fillers are among the most popular aesthetic procedures because they carry immediate results, very few risks and little recovery time. About HA Fillers: Hyaluronic acid is a natural substance found in your body. High concentrations are found in soft connective tissues and in the fluid surrounding your eyes. It's also in some cartilage and joint fluids, as well as skin tissue. It is extracted and reformulated and now has become one of the most popular kinds of injectable fillers.If the term sounds familiar, it's because the same substance is often injected into the aching joints of people with arthritis to ease pain and provide extra cushioning. Hyaluronic acid is not derived from animal sources.When this gel is injected, it acts like an inflated cushion to support facial structures and tissues that may have lost volume or elasticity due to normal aging. It also brings water to the surface of skin to keep it looking fresh and supple.In the last few decades, various synthetic forms of hyaluronic acid have been developed and used to correct disorders in the fields of rheumatology, ophthalmology and wound repair. More recently, synthetic forms of hyaluronic acid are being manufactured for use in face augmentation. About Ca(OH)Apatite: Hydroxylapatite (also calledhydroxyapatite and calcium hydroxylapatite) is mineral-like injectable filler. This mineral is also found in bone and hydroxylapatite has been used for many years in treating bone problems and filling in defects in bone. It was approved for use as a soft tissue filler in cosmetic medicine in 2006. CaHA is biodegradable, following the same metabolic pathway as bone debris resulting from common bone fractures. After 2–3 months, the carboxymethylcellulose is resorbed and replaced by collagen. Finally a gradual breakdown of the particles occurs, until complete phagocytosis is achieved.



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